Colorado taxation – Pilger Nebraska http://pilgernebraska.net/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:55:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pilgernebraska.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-47-150x150.png Colorado taxation – Pilger Nebraska http://pilgernebraska.net/ 32 32 🌱 Union Station Repression + Property Tax Relief + Nurse Shortage https://pilgernebraska.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-union-station-repression-property-tax-relief-nurse-shortage/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:55:17 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-union-station-repression-property-tax-relief-nurse-shortage/ Good day, neighbors! Brad K. Evans here with your brand new edition of the Denver Daily. Saturday’s weather: Clouds and sun. High: 80 Low: 50. 🏡 Are you a local real estate agent? Let us help you generate leads, grow your brand in Denver, and set you apart from the competition. Click here to find […]]]>

Good day, neighbors! Brad K. Evans here with your brand new edition of the Denver Daily.


Saturday’s weather: Clouds and sun. High: 80 Low: 50.


🏡 Are you a local real estate agent? Let us help you generate leads, grow your brand in Denver, and set you apart from the competition. Click here to find out more.


Here are today’s top stories in Denver:

  1. Property Tax Reduction Bill sent to Governor for signature. The Colorado Legislature approved the temporary property tax cut plan, voting unanimously to send the bill to the governor. (Co Newsline)
  2. Hospitals in the metropolitan area are facing a nursing staffing crisis. It could be the biggest nursing shortage in decades and could ultimately impact patient care. (FOX31)
  3. New cases of COVID-19 in Colorado have nearly tripled. Just when you thought it was over, cases and hospitalizations related to the COVID-19 virus have increased dramatically over the past month, and the number of new outbreaks of the disease identified by the Ministry of Public Health and Colorado Environment has nearly tripled in the past three weeks. (Westword)
  4. State legislators planned to fill the aquifers. The plan sets aside $60 million to remove irrigation wells that have been used to irrigate farmland. Federal COVID relief money will fund the program in two river basins, hoping to meet groundwater sustainability goals. (CPR)
  5. Union Station crackdown results in nearly 1,000 arrests, but has it solved the problem? Denver police’s recent attention at the Transit Station has focused primarily on apprehending drug addicts. It turns out that arrests aren’t always the most effective way to deal with a drug crisis and often make the problems worse. (Denverite)

Today in Denver:

  • Women Only: Concealed transport classes. (10h)
  • Family story time on nature tales: Denver Botanical Gardens. (10:30 a.m.)
  • Trolley tours: At the Plains Conservation Center. (Noon)
  • Viaduct Night Market: Under the Mile High Stadium overpass. (4pm-10pm)
  • Don Quixote Nuevo: Denver Center for the Performing Arts. (7:30 p.m.)
  • Lunar Pulse Live: In the western sky. (8 p.m.)
  • Best concerts in Denver this weekend: Bison bones, electric animals and southern culture on skates. (Westword)

From my notebook:

  • Funeral for artists’ pandemic losses by a burlesque performer. Colorado artists will gather at headquarters on Monday May 16, to showcase their art and have a symbolic funeral for the artistic opportunities lost during the pandemic. (Westword)
  • Step into the Supernatural with Artist-in-Residence Kevin Snipes as he shares the body of work he created during his time at ASLD. The exhibit includes ceramic works created by Snipes, as well as works by students from North High School’s ceramics program.
    Snipes will give a lecture on the exhibition and his artistic approach on Saturday May 14 at 1 p.m.. (Art Students League)
  • Looking for a farmer’s market? Here’s a list of farmers’ markets in the metropolitan area to check out. (5280)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

Events:


You are officially informed for today. See you all bright and early Monday morning for another edition of the Denver Daily. — Brad K. Evans

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Tax relief draws bipartisan praise – but party leaders diverge on real 2022 session savings https://pilgernebraska.net/tax-relief-draws-bipartisan-praise-but-party-leaders-diverge-on-real-2022-session-savings/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:01:24 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/tax-relief-draws-bipartisan-praise-but-party-leaders-diverge-on-real-2022-session-savings/ Gathered under a banner shouting the phrase ‘Moving Colorado Forward,’ Governor Jared Polis and the Democrats in the legislative leadership hailed what they described as groundbreaking achievements for Colorado families in the session that ended just before midnight Wednesday. The bills they passed would put more money in the pockets of households and businesses, they […]]]>

Gathered under a banner shouting the phrase ‘Moving Colorado Forward,’ Governor Jared Polis and the Democrats in the legislative leadership hailed what they described as groundbreaking achievements for Colorado families in the session that ended just before midnight Wednesday. The bills they passed would put more money in the pockets of households and businesses, they said, at a time when record inflation is driving up the costs of basic necessities.

“It’s no secret that one of the biggest goals of Coloradans and mine was to save people money,” Polis said during a Thursday morning news conference on the first floor of the Colorado Capitol building. Governor listed bills passed this session to temporarily reduce property taxes, send Colorado taxpayers prepayment checks of $400 or more, reduce vehicle registration fees and implement free preschool and universal in 2023.

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In the House gallery half an hour later — at a subsequent press conference held by the House Republican minority caucus — perspectives differed on the true savings of the session for Coloradans.

GOP officials said they would have liked to provide more savings to businesses facing the pandemic and less regulation of the energy industry, which they said would drive up costs. Democratic-led policies to regulate toxic air pollution and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings passed in the final days of the session despite strong GOP opposition.

For months, Republicans and Democrats in the state legislature have said they want to pass legislation that would save Coloradians money. Though they often disagree on other policies, one bill brought together the party leaders: House Speaker Alec Garnett, a Democrat from Denver, and House Minority Leader Hugh McKean, a Republican from Loveland, both praised the bill to temporarily reduce property taxes over the next two years.

“My No. 1 priority this session (was) to lower the cost of living in Colorado and make life more affordable, to help put money in the pockets of families in our state,” said Garnett at the Democrats’ press conference. “And I can say without hesitation and without a doubt that that is what we did.”

Senate Bill 22-238, which passed the House unanimously on Friday, would temporarily reduce residential and commercial property tax rates, delivering $700 million in savings over two years to homeowners and tenants. Colorado businesses, about $200 million of which would come out of prepayments that the state is constitutionally required to refund to taxpayers in years it sees big increases in revenue. The average owner of a $500,000 home will save $274 on their property tax bill next year.

The bill represented a compromise between state lawmakers, the Polis administration and Colorado Concern, a group of business leaders who had worked to place a measure on the ballot asking voters to cap the increase of the assessed value of a property at 3%. The measure could have cost local governments and school districts $1.3 billion, according to a state tax analysis. Colorado Concern withdrew its proposed ballot measure after the passage of SB-238, which includes money to partially offset lost local government revenue.

McKean described property tax legislation as one of the ways his caucus’ priorities have appeared in bills passed this session.

“Property taxes for Coloradans are going to be reduced,” McKean said. “It’s a big problem.”

Republican Representative Marc Catlin of Montrose, left, listens as Minority Leader Hugh McKean, R-Loveland, speaks during a press conference May 12, 2022, at the Colorado State Capitol building. Rep. Mike Lynch, R-Wellington, stands to McKean’s right. (Faith Miller/Colorado Newsline)

But Rep. Colin Larson, a Republican from Littleton, and some of his colleagues questioned the sincerity of the ‘save people money’ slogan when it was repeated by Democrats throughout the session. . The property tax relief should have been much greater, he said, and should not have taken money away from future tax refunds.

Larson and other Republicans also wanted to see more money put back into the state’s unemployment insurance trust fund, which was depleted when unemployment rates soared during the pandemic. As a result, Colorado has a $1 billion unemployment insurance debt to the federal government. The bill that lawmakers eventually passed to address the issue provided $600 million to restore the UITF to solvency. That was enough to appease business groups, but it wasn’t enough to remove surcharges for employers who are required to help pay down the debt.

“If we were actually talking about real tax responsibility, real money savings for people and money savings for small businesses, we would have invested enough money in (UITF) to avoid the surcharge itself and to get us back to solvency,” Larson says. “Instead, we got a $600 million refund, which…isn’t nothing, but it’s not as much as it should have been, especially in a year where we had as much money as we had.”

GOP wins changes in final hours of session

The stalling tactics of House Republicans in the final hours of the session, when hundreds of bills still remained on the table, gave the minority caucus much more leverage to pass its own priority bills and amendments. . Deputy Minority Leader Tim Geitner, a Falcon Republican, mentioned a last-minute change the GOP was able to make to Senate Bill 22-230, politically charged legislation allowing county employees to engage in collective negotiations.

“We were able to get the things we were hoping to attach to this bill attached to this bill,” Geitner said. “It was A, starting with a timeline, because there really was no timeline.”

A last-minute amendment stipulates that a board of county commissioners would have more time to fund the terms of a collective agreement. In any given year after SB-230 takes effect, the amendment clarifies that a county finalizing its budget in December would not be required to fund a contract with an employee union that year. – unless the agreement was reached before October 15 and the union had been certified before June 1.

Republicans also won an amendment to exempt counties with populations under 7,500. The cost of collective bargaining rights, Geitner said, would be “a burden they simply cannot afford.”

SB-230, one of the session’s most anticipated bills, was originally envisioned as a way to grant a much wider range of public employees the right to unionize. But Senate Majority Leader Steve Fenberg, the bill’s primary sponsor, still touted the legislation as a victory for “tens of thousands of county workers” on Thursday.

“We stood up for Colorado workers and invested in the people who make our economy work,” he said.

Universal preschool, more options for parents

Polis defended the law that laid the groundwork for universal preschool education in Colorado, which he signed on April 25 while saying it would save families money. Under Bill 22-1295, the free preschool program funded by voter-approved taxes on tobacco and nicotine products will begin in the fall of 2023.

The state’s new Department of Early Childhood will select a local organization to coordinate early education in each community, help families apply for programs, and recruit preschools into the provider network. All Colorado children will be entitled to 10 hours of preschool instruction per week at no cost to their parents the year before they enter kindergarten.

HB22-1295 passed by a vote of 24 to 11 in the Senate and 43 to 19 in the House, mostly along party lines in both houses. In the House, Larson, Mary Bradfield of Colorado Springs and Dan Woog of Erie were the only Republicans to vote “yes”. Senators Dennis Hisey of Colorado Springs, Kevin Priola of Henderson, Cleave Simpson of Alamosa and Rob Woodward were the four GOP members who supported the bill in the Senate.

Meanwhile, a bipartisan group of Senate Appropriations Committee lawmakers on Tuesday killed a bill to ban flavored nicotine products statewide. Bill 22-1064 would have cost the state more than $46 million as of July 1, 2025 — much of that tax revenue tied to the universal preschool program, a key campaign promise for Polis.

Larson pointed to a bill he saw as giving parents more choice in how they educate their children, another stated priority of the Republican caucus this session. This was Senate Bill 22-197 to codify “School Innovation Zones” which are governed by an agency separate from a school board. According to Chalkbeat, the bill would protect the existence of semi-autonomous schools in Denver that fall outside the jurisdiction of the Denver Public Schools Board and institute a dispute resolution process.

Although it is led by three Democrats from Denver – the senses. James Coleman and Chris Hansen, and Rep. Jennifer Bacon — SB-197 passed the House Wednesday night with more Republican votes than Democratic votes, Larson pointed out.

“Thanks to Republican votes,” he said, “the children of Denver will see their schools, their high-performing schools, continue to operate successfully with a high degree of autonomy.”

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Millions of Colorado taxpayers could get a $500 tax refund for single filers or $1,000 for joint filers https://pilgernebraska.net/millions-of-colorado-taxpayers-could-get-a-500-tax-refund-for-single-filers-or-1000-for-joint-filers/ Tue, 10 May 2022 21:57:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/millions-of-colorado-taxpayers-could-get-a-500-tax-refund-for-single-filers-or-1000-for-joint-filers/ DENVER (KKTV) — If you’re a Colorado taxpayer, there’s a chance you’ll get at least a $500 tax refund later this year. On April 25, Governor Jared Polis announced a proposal using TABOR to benefit “all hard-working taxpayers in Colorado.” Originally, it was estimated that each taxpayer who filed their return on time would receive […]]]>

DENVER (KKTV) — If you’re a Colorado taxpayer, there’s a chance you’ll get at least a $500 tax refund later this year.

On April 25, Governor Jared Polis announced a proposal using TABOR to benefit “all hard-working taxpayers in Colorado.” Originally, it was estimated that each taxpayer who filed their return on time would receive a rebate of $400. 11 News has confirmed to Colorado House Democratic Communications Director Jarrett Freedman that refund checks may increase.

“We are certain based on conversations with DOR [Department of Revenue] and OSPB [Office of State Planning and Budgeting] that rebate checks will increase, and we believe we will have a solid number to report by the date the invoice is signed,” Freedman explained. “The administration estimates it will be at least $500 for single filers and $1,000 for joint filers.”

An amendment was added at third reading to allow prepayments to climb even further if revenues return higher than expected, as early estimates indicate.

“Colorado’s strong economic recovery means we can send even more money back to taxpayers in September to help with the rising cost of living and pay for necessities like gas, groceries and rent,” said the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Tony Exum, Sr. D-Colorado Springs. “We are delighted that based on positive economic indicators, we will be able to increase the amount of prepayment checks Coloradans will receive in September. People are struggling now, so we are providing this urgent help as soon as possible in a fairer and more equitable way. »

How it works: If you’re a full-time resident and filed your 2021 tax returns by June 30, 2022, you should receive a refund.

The legislation is SB22-233 and still needs to get Senate and governor approval following the amendment. The amendment specifies that 85-87% of excess income will be refunded to taxpayers through this mechanism – in an equal amount for single filers and double that amount for joint filers.

Click here to learn more about TABOR.

Copyright 2022 KKTV. All rights reserved.

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Massachusetts Grandma Lost Her Life Savings Due To Tax Foreclosure Law https://pilgernebraska.net/massachusetts-grandma-lost-her-life-savings-due-to-tax-foreclosure-law/ Mon, 09 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/massachusetts-grandma-lost-her-life-savings-due-to-tax-foreclosure-law/ When Deborah Foss, a 66-year-old grandmother in New Bedford, Mass., bought her home in 2015, she expected it to be where she would live the rest of her life in comfort and security. But by February this year, she had been forced out of her home and is now reduced to living in her car. […]]]>

When Deborah Foss, a 66-year-old grandmother in New Bedford, Mass., bought her home in 2015, she expected it to be where she would live the rest of her life in comfort and security. But by February this year, she had been forced out of her home and is now reduced to living in her car.

What went wrong? With chronic health issues and living on a fixed income, Foss fell behind on her property taxes when she went through tough financial times. That’s when the city sold a $9,626 tax lien on his home to a private investment firm. Under Massachusetts law, the lien gave the corporation the power to take full title to its property when it failed to pay its debt quickly enough. The company evicted Foss and quickly sold the property. Almost before she could figure out what was going on, she had lost her home and $210,000 in capital.

Foss is just one of the victims of a form of tax foreclosure that is perhaps best described as government-sanctioned home equity theft. People who don’t pay their property taxes in all states risk losing their homes. But most states will sell the property to the highest bidder, collect what’s owed, and return the remaining proceeds, providing at least some protection for the owner. Massachusetts is one of only twelve states that allows the government to claw back 100% of someone’s hard-earned savings for the benefit of the government or private investors.

In my legal work on this issue, I have encountered many victims of home equity theft. They are usually hard working people who have suffered financial hardship, often due to medical issues, or who were not notified or did not realize that their property was at risk. They never imagined that something like this could happen in the United States.

Take Uri Rafaeli, who lost his Michigan rental and all of his net worth when he accidentally underpaid his property taxes by $8. He fought all the way to the Michigan Supreme Court to prove that the county had unconstitutionally taken more than it should. Rafaeli got his house back after his win on the pitch, but most people aren’t so lucky.

Lynette Johnson lost her small business property when the city sent tax notices to the wrong address. The city sold its property for $101,000 to a private investor when it failed to pay. Although she owed less than $20,000 in taxes, penalties, interest and fees, the city kept every penny. (My firm, Pacific Legal Foundation, is a pro-liberty public interest legal organization that has provided or continues to provide free legal assistance to Foss, Rafaeli, and Johnson).

It doesn’t have to be like that, that’s why we fight back in court. We have filed lawsuits in various states challenging the constitutionality of home equity theft as a violation of property rights protections under the Fifth Amendment. Courts in different jurisdictions disagree on its constitutionality, so it may require a Supreme Court ruling to settle the matter.

Meanwhile, state lawmakers are bipartisanly engaging to address the issue through the legislative process. Montana, North Dakota and Wisconsin recently set their laws to end home equity theft. Bills that would end abusive tax foreclosures are pending in Massachusetts, Minnesota and California.

This may be bad news for companies that have found a profitable niche in weaponizing foreclosures against the most vulnerable. This means that county and municipal officials who shared the bounty will have to give up these comfortable arrangements that generate windfall revenue for local governments. But these reforms will be a big win for landowners who are ruthlessly targeted by these vicious tax grabs.

Not all states are getting it right: A Minnesota case lost at the Eighth Circuit — with a Supreme Court petition pending — and the legislation is stalled in Arizona.

Perhaps abusive tax garnishees have been allowed to continue because most people are unaware that it happens regularly in their state. Currently, this list includes Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon. And a few other states sometimes engage in this kind of predatory seizure when the government wants the property to fulfill another public use.

We all understand that people are obligated to pay their taxes and those who don’t will face the consequences, and sometimes foreclosure. But the government should not be allowed to take the savings accumulated in these properties. The more Americans learn about how the government targets people like Deborah Foss, Uri Rafaeli and Lynette Johnson, the less they like it — and the more likely they are to demand that the government stop the theft.

We’ve made huge strides in tackling the unfair practice of home equity theft in recent years – now we need a boost to make these unfair foreclosures a thing of the past.

Christina Martin is Senior Counsel at Pacific Legal Foundation and leads PLF’s initiative to stop home equity theft. Follow her on Twitter @CMM123.

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Missouri senators float $500 tax refunds for residents https://pilgernebraska.net/missouri-senators-float-500-tax-refunds-for-residents/ Sat, 07 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/missouri-senators-float-500-tax-refunds-for-residents/ As inflation continues to remain high across the country, many Missouri taxpayers could qualify for a one-time refund of up to $500 per person under a plan approved by state senators. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the cost of the proposal is capped at $500 million, which means final check amounts could be adjusted […]]]>

As inflation continues to remain high across the country, many Missouri taxpayers could qualify for a one-time refund of up to $500 per person under a plan approved by state senators.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the cost of the proposal is capped at $500 million, which means final check amounts could be adjusted downward if claims for the money exceed the set limit.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Dan Hegeman, a Republican who sponsored the plan, described it as “a rebate of your hard-earned (tax) dollars.” He added that “it allows taxpayers to get some of their money back.”

The Associated Press reported that the Senate proposal is similar to one previously passed by the House, but would apply to fewer residents at a lower cost to the state. Refunds will be limited to taxpayers earning $150,000 or less, or $300,000 for a married couple, and those who did not pay income tax in 2021 will not be eligible for the money. The plan still needs a final vote from the Senate to be presented to the House and then to Gov. Mike Parson.

“I think we’ve landed in a place that’s a good place,” Senate Minority Leader John Rizzo noted. “I think we have a pretty good compromise here.” He added that the plan focused tax relief on “middle-income people” who “have gone through the spine in recent years” due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

Like Missouri, several other states have rushed to offer their own version of tax refunds or stimulus checks to help ease the burden of searing inflation that has reached a forty-year high. For example, in a rebate program proposed by Hawaii legislators, taxpayers earning less than $100,000 a year and their dependents will receive a $300 payment. For those who earn more than six figures per year, they will receive $100.

Not to be outdone, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf is urging lawmakers to dish out $2,000 checks to families in the state with incomes of $80,000 or less, Maine state lawmakers recently approved a budget that includes $850 stimulus checks for approximately 858,000 residents and New Mexico residents can now expect to receive cash rebates of between $500 and $1,000.

Meanwhile, in Colorado, Gov. Jared Polis and the state legislature have proposed the Colorado Cashback program, which will provide eligible residents with a $400 payment this summer. In Minnesota, Governor Tim Walz is seeking direct payments of $500 for single filers earning less than $164,400 and $1,000 for couples earning less than $273,470. Finally, in California, Governor Gavin Newson is pushing for a $400 tax refund in the form of a debit card.

Ethen Kim Lieser is a Washington State-based finance and technology editor who has held positions at Google, The Korea Herald, Lincoln Journal Star, AsianWeek, and Arirang TV. Follow or contact him on LinkedIn.

Image: Reuters

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Nine states already send child tax credits to working families https://pilgernebraska.net/nine-states-already-send-child-tax-credits-to-working-families/ Wed, 04 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/nine-states-already-send-child-tax-credits-to-working-families/ As the new year began, millions of American parents were thrust into a new reality in which they had to make ends meet without the help of monthly Enhanced Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments. Now that the federal CTC program is over, Fox Business reported that analysts at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities […]]]>

As the new year began, millions of American parents were thrust into a new reality in which they had to make ends meet without the help of monthly Enhanced Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments.

Now that the federal CTC program is over, Fox Business reported that analysts at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) are urging state governments to step in and create their own version of the enhanced credits.

“Child tax credits are an important way for policymakers to help families make ends meet, help children thrive now and in the future, and help families and communities to recover from the pandemic,” the CBPP analysts wrote.

“The federal credit should be expanded, and states should also create and improve their own CTCs (among other tax credits that help low-income households). … Federal and state child tax credits are an effective way to target tax cuts to the people and communities who could use the aid the most,” they continued.

According to the CBPP, nine states have already funded their own CTC programs, and there may be more on the way. For example, Colorado introduced a CTC program last year that families will be able to claim for the first time when they file their 2022 tax returns next year. Not to be outdone, Maryland created a new CTC for families with children with disabilities, and New Mexico recently signed a CTC worth up to $175 per child.

“Research found that monthly CTC payments provided through the US bailout significantly reduced monthly child poverty and helped families meet basic needs such as food, utilities, clothing, rent and education-related costs,” the analysts explained.

“CBPP estimated that the federal CLC expansion of the bailout in 2021…will lift 4.1 million children, including 1.2 million black children and 1.7 million Latino children, above the federal poverty line. …Research suggests that additional income can lead to significant improvements in access to nutritious food, maternal and child health, children’s years of completed schooling, and reduced stress on families at home. low income,” they added.

The CBPP warned that state lawmakers should not focus solely on reducing income taxes, which would “primarily benefit wealthy households and profitable businesses.” The analysts said, “Instead, state policymakers should take equitable and targeted approaches to help families meet basic needs by improving or expanding tax credits like CTCs.”

In the last six months of last year, the enhanced child tax credit provided eligible parents with up to $3,600 for a child under six and up to $3,000 for children aged from six to seventeen years old. This amounted to a payment of $250 or $300 for each child that was sent to parents each month.

Without extending the program, the credit dropped by $1,000 per school-aged child and $1,600 per child under six. In addition, millions of families with the lowest incomes in the country are once again ineligible for credits.

Ethen Kim Lieser is a Washington State-based finance and technology editor who has held positions at Google, The Korea Herald, Lincoln Journal Star, AsianWeek, and Arirang TV. Follow him or contact him on LinkedIn.

Picture: Reuters.

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To actively conserve water, we need tax credits, incentives and penalties https://pilgernebraska.net/to-actively-conserve-water-we-need-tax-credits-incentives-and-penalties/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:01:56 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/to-actively-conserve-water-we-need-tax-credits-incentives-and-penalties/ (Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) A water parking strip in Draper, which was funded using a state-run rebate and incentive program, is shown August 6, 2021. By Scott Schannon | The public gallery | May 1, 2022, 12:00 p.m. In 2016, The Tribune published a letter I wrote, “We live in a desert”, […]]]>

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) A water parking strip in Draper, which was funded using a state-run rebate and incentive program, is shown August 6, 2021.

In 2016, The Tribune published a letter I wrote, “We live in a desert”, regarding our use of water. In 2019, The Tribune published another letter I wrote, “Ways to Reduce Water Use”.

On April 21, Governor Cox declared a state drought emergency. Utah’s reservoirs are currently at 59% of the state’s capacity, while the state’s snow levels are now at 70% of normal for this point of the year. The US Drought Monitor recently published an update on the drought situation in Utah, indicating that 44% of the state is in extreme drought conditions, while most of the rest of the state is in severe drought condition.

Shame on all elected officials in the state of Utah. Shame on you all.

I get it, people moving into our state means more income and taxes. More homes, more businesses and less water for everyone. Our government officials tell us that the Colorado River is in danger. Lake Powell is at its lowest. There’s talk of renaming the Great Salt Lake a tiny mud puddle (okay, maybe not that extreme). But all we do is talk and talk and…

All these new homes and businesses that we’re building and we’re putting lawns around every square inch. Lawns requiring a lot of water. Lawns that need to be mowed (let’s also increase air pollution). Lawns that require chemicals to keep grass green and feed weeds, every spring, summer and fall (let’s keep destroying our soil). This is madness at the highest level. We can’t go on living like this!

When will the powers that be start issuing real tax credits, incentives and penalties? If people have lawns, a real tax credit to pull them up and xeriscape. You want to keep your lawn, and I can’t imagine why, higher water usage cost or tax penalty. Same thing for businesses. Why are there lawns around these buildings? Grass is absolutely useless. Add incentives for all new construction of homes and businesses.

Six years ago, La Tribune published my first letter on our water. Three years ago The Tribune published my second letter. Today is April 22 and we have done nothing but talk and talk. Wake up Utah before it’s too late to do anything.

Scott Schannon, Cottonwood Heights

Send a letter to the editor

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JDA Seeks New Appraiser Meeting to Affirm Rivian Site’s Tax Status https://pilgernebraska.net/jda-seeks-new-appraiser-meeting-to-affirm-rivian-sites-tax-status/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 20:19:43 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/jda-seeks-new-appraiser-meeting-to-affirm-rivian-sites-tax-status/ MADISON, Ga. – An opposition group reportedly hired more legal aid this week in its fight against the construction of the Rivian vehicle plant while the Joint Development Authority (JDA) has pledged to challenge the legality of a delay committee of assessors to affirm the tax-exempt status of the plant site. JDA officials also asked […]]]>

MADISON, Ga. – An opposition group reportedly hired more legal aid this week in its fight against the construction of the Rivian vehicle plant while the Joint Development Authority (JDA) has pledged to challenge the legality of a delay committee of assessors to affirm the tax-exempt status of the plant site.

JDA officials also asked Morgan County Board of Tax Assessors Chair Mary Ellen Anton today to schedule another meeting to affirm the public site’s tax status after a Wednesday meeting failed to met the requirements of the Georgia Open Meetings Act and one member had a “clear conflict that obscures his ability to make an impartial legal decision on this matter.”

Keith Wilson of Morgan, Land, Sky & Water Preservation Inc. (MLSWP) said in a Facebook post Thursday that the group has hired an anonymous “litigation lawyer” who will “work in concert” with law firm Stack & Associates. focused on environmental law. he hired in January to represent him.

“While we cannot disclose the strategy, please know that the legal team is working diligently on our behalf and MLSWP is pleased to make this announcement,” Wilson said. “Together they will address the harm done to our community by the state and the JDA.”

Wilson, who is seeking election to the Morgan County Commission this year, said the JDA and Gov. Brian Kemp “have inflicted anguish on the citizens of the communities surrounding the proposed Rivian site.”

“There was surprise and shock, fear of the unknown, inability to learn facts and details, and anticipation of an opportunity to have their voices heard at rezoning hearings” , Wilson said.

He said Kemp and state economic development commissioner Pat Wilson “caught them off guard before their voices could be heard by taking the project off the local level and shielding it from local decisions” by doing from the state government the landowner.

As a result, the state government is not required to go through the zoning processes overseen by city and county governments.

“Governor. Kemp has denied these communities their right to have a voice, a treasured right granted by the Georgia Constitution, so it appears a broader legal strategy must begin,” Wilson wrote in a Facebook post.

The announcement follows two days of action by the JDA to finalize an economic development agreement with the state and Rivian on Tuesday; and to seek certification Wednesday by the Morgan County Board of Tax Assessors of a lease plan that was part of the agreement and stated that state-owned land would not be taxable.

Under the agreement, the Georgia state government will purchase the land from the JDA and lease it to Rivian – which plans a $5 billion production and research facility on 2,000 acres in Walton Counties. and Morgan.

The state government, like other public entities in Georgia, does not pay property taxes on the land it owns.

However, the agreement specifies the amount the company will pay in payments in lieu of taxes (PILOT), which could total $300 million over 25 years and be shared among the four JDA counties.

Newton will receive more than $90 million of the total, as he owns about 32% of the taxes collected from JDA-operated business parks.

With the overwhelmingly anti-Rivian crowd present urging them — and against the advice of County Attorney Christian Henry — members of the Board of Tax Assessors voted to delay action, or file, the JDA’s application for certification of the council, the land will not be subject to taxation, the Morgan County Citizen reported.

Audience member Jeanne Dufort complained that the plan did not give Morgan County enough money to cover what she said were the public costs of the overall impact of the Rivian project. .

Board member John Artz, husband of Rivian opponent JoEllen Artz, also urged other members on Wednesday to file the request because it differed from previous requests to determine tax-exempt status for projects such as the Facebook’s data centers that were on industrial land in the original Stanton Springs business park south of the Rivian site.

But Henry said the council was overstepping its authority by reviewing the merits of the entire Rivian deal rather than just checking whether the lease was tax-exempt, the Citizen newspaper reported.

Afterwards, JDA spokesman Ben Sheidler said any action taken was moot anyway and another meeting was needed because Wednesday’s rally in Madison did not meet the requirements of the law. on public meetings of the State.

JDA attorney Andrea Gray sent a letter today, April 29, to Anton stating that another meeting was needed because Wednesday’s meeting was not properly advertised and an order from the day was not provided as required by Georgia’s open meeting law.

The letter also stated that John Artz had a conflict of interest when considering any Rivian-related applications due to his relationship with JoEllen Artz, Sheidler said.

John Artz’s abilities to fairly assess the JDA’s request on Wednesday were “clouded” due to the dispute, Sheidler said.

“It is clear that Mr. John Artz is opposed to this project based on his statements and behavior (Wednesday),” said a JDA statement released today.

“Unfortunately, his behavior created an intimidating atmosphere for other board members by allowing unruly disruptions by many of his opposition group mates. Even though the meeting was not valid, his actions prevented the board of directors to examine the merits of the case before them.

“While we respect the right to oppose the project, the Council should still be allowed to debate and act on the people’s business. Because of this bias and his wife’s leadership role in the group of opposition, there is a clear conflict that obscures its ability to render an impartial judicial decision on this matter.

“We believe that this clear conflict should be considered by the Council before the postponed meeting.”

Sheidler also said that “the Tax Assessor Board’s only decision point is a determination, consistent with the many other projects, that the lease agreement between the JDA and Rivian is not subject to tax.”

“We expect this project to continue to progress as planned. We look forward to providing additional information and engaging with the Morgan County Board of Tax Assessors prior to the next meeting to ensure they have what they need to recognize this bond structure, which is consistent with previous developments they approved.

He said the same board had approved the same financial structure for the Baymare project at Stanton Springs South, which was a $42 billion bond issue with 20-year tax-exempt status, in 2021.

“Morgan County has also approved this arrangement for many other projects outside of Stanton Springs,” Sheidler said. “Like other projects, Rivian will be required to make payments in lieu of taxes, or PILOT payments, which will be shared by the community.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: This version has been updated from an earlier version with new information.

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Governor’s Gas Tax Suspension in Senate Committee https://pilgernebraska.net/governors-gas-tax-suspension-in-senate-committee/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/governors-gas-tax-suspension-in-senate-committee/ RICHMOND, Va. (WDBJ) — Members of a Senate committee rejected Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s plan for a gas tax holiday as they returned to Richmond on Wednesday. Youngkin’s proposal would suspend the gas tax for three months, before gradually reinstating it. The goal is to reduce the price at the pump by approximately 26 cents per […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va. (WDBJ) — Members of a Senate committee rejected Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s plan for a gas tax holiday as they returned to Richmond on Wednesday.

Youngkin’s proposal would suspend the gas tax for three months, before gradually reinstating it.

The goal is to reduce the price at the pump by approximately 26 cents per gallon.

Sen. Steve Newman (R-Bedford Co) introduced the bill in the Senate and he introduced the bill to the Senate Finance Committee on Wednesday morning.

“Looking around this committee, I imagine everyone here will be fine whether the bill passes or not,” Newman said. “That’s not true for all working Virginians.”

Other speakers told lawmakers that a gas tax exemption would make a big difference for many Virginians.

“We are feeling the sting of inflation. It’s double to fill our tanks. Every grocery item increased. Families in Virginia need relief,” said Loretta Greene.

But opponents have argued that savings are not guaranteed and that the plan would take hundreds of millions of dollars from building critical roads and other transportation needs.

“All of this couldn’t come at a worse time from a highway maintenance perspective,” said Sen. Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax). “It couldn’t come at a worse time.”

Other transportation advocates and stakeholders agreed.

“Shortening our transportation system will hurt all Virginians, and those without cars will be the hardest hit,” said Trip Pollard of the Southern Environmental Law Center. “There are better ways to deal with rising costs without hurting our transportation system, and we urge you to reject this bill.”

The vote to “pass indefinitely” was 12 to 3, with 11 Democrats and 1 Republican voting against suspending the gas tax.

After the vote, Governor Youngkin told reporters he was disappointed with the decision.

“This money belongs to Virginians and it’s a chance for us to give Virginians a break when they need it most,” Youngkin said. “And so yeah, I’m really disappointed that Democrats don’t see that.”

The proposal is still in the House of Delegates, and Democrats have proposed a competing plan that could also offer Virginians some relief from high gas prices. But none of these plans will take effect on May 1, as Governor Youngkin had proposed.

Copyright 2022 WDBJ. All rights reserved.

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Consumer Voice: Missed your tax deadline? | https://pilgernebraska.net/consumer-voice-missed-your-tax-deadline/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://pilgernebraska.net/consumer-voice-missed-your-tax-deadline/ If you haven’t filed your taxes by the deadline, the Internal Revenue Service recommends that you file them as soon as possible to avoid fines. If you are supposed to get a refund from the IRS, you will not receive a late filing penalty. But the IRS says if you owe money and missed the […]]]>

If you haven’t filed your taxes by the deadline, the Internal Revenue Service recommends that you file them as soon as possible to avoid fines.

If you are supposed to get a refund from the IRS, you will not receive a late filing penalty. But the IRS says if you owe money and missed the deadline without asking for an extension, you should file as soon as possible to limit penalties and fines.

The IRS said families who don’t owe money can still file their 2021 tax returns and claim the child tax credit through April 15, 2025, without penalties.

According to the IRS, some taxpayers are automatically granted additional time to file without penalties. Military personnel who have served or are currently serving in a combat zone may be granted an extension of at least 180 days to file their taxes.

Some others that qualify include support personnel in combat zones or a contingency operation in support of the armed forces. This also includes taxpayers outside the United States. Some disaster victims have also received an extension. The tax deadline has been extended for victims of the Marshall Fire until May 16, 2022.

The IRS encourages consumers to file their taxes electronically, including IRS Free File, which you can find at IRS.gov. The fastest way to get a refund is to choose direct deposit. The IRS said 9 out of 10 refunds are issued within three weeks for taxpayers who file electronically and choose direct deposit.

If you file for an extension, you have an additional six months to file with a new deadline of October 17, 2022. If you owe taxes after April 18, interest will be charged until the balance is paid off, according to the ‘IRS. You can find more information at irs.gov.

Agent scam resurfaces

Plus, we see a familiar scam ring again. The Fountain Police Department warned that several residents had received scam phone calls from callers posing as local officers. Callers even use the names of real officers and city officials.

The Fountain Police would like to remind you that law enforcement officials will not call you and demand money right away in order to prevent someone from going to jail. If you receive a call like this, hang up.

You can always call the legitimate service to make sure they are trying to reach you. Never give your personal or financial information to anyone you don’t know.

Also, I’ve heard a lot of people talk about a lot of different scams and consumer issues. I want to remind you that you can always call the statewide consumer hotline to report scams and fraud. The Attorney General’s office operates Stop Fraud Colorado. You can reach the helpline at 800-222-4444 or online at StopFraudColorado.gov.

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