How Iowa football’s timely offense, Jack Campbell fueled the win over CSU

IOWA CITY – A popular and accurate thought among Iowa fans after the first games of the season was that one day the offense would have to reclaim the defense and special teams to win a game.

While it would be an exaggeration to say that the offense gained the upper hand against Colorado State on Saturday, it did enough to help the Hawkeyes come out of a surprising halftime deficit.

Spencer Petras threw a 27-yard touchdown pass to Sam LaPorta to break a tie in the third quarter and pitched for a season-high 224 yards as sixth-place Iowa withstood a formidable effort from the Rams of the Mountain West Conference to win, 24-14, in front of 65,456 fans at Kinnick Stadium.

“There were ups and downs… but especially in the third quarter,” said Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz, “we’ve seen some growth and good things.”

The recovery of Jack Campbell's fumble in the third quarter was a game-changer for sixth-place Iowa.

It wasn’t the cruise control victory that punters had projected for the 23-point favorite Hawkeyes, who improved to 4-0. They were punched in the mouth by a physical team who a week ago were holding Toledo by 6 points. If you were wondering which Colorado State team would show up, this was the one – not the one that lost to FCS South Dakota State in the opener.

And if you’re going to witness a fight, you want to be on Jack Campbell’s side.

The formidable Iowa center linebacker was apparently everywhere on Saturday to help roll back Colorado State (1-3). He recorded 18 tackles, the most by a Hawkeye since Anthony Hitchens had 19 against Iowa State in 2012. And when Iowa needed a big game, Campbell was again, just like he was. was in Ames (with a fumble recovery touchdown) and final week (with a forced fumble as Kent State was close to scoring).

Campbell came across a forced fumble by Yahya Black that was gift-wrapped at the Colorado State 6-yard line with Iowa trailing, 14-7.

One play later, Tyrone Tracy Jr. trotted to the end zone on a well-crafted reverse call – a play resembling a “Statue of Liberty” – to tie the score, 14-14.

“I just try to get around the ball first and foremost, and usually good things happen,” said Campbell.

Petras’ 27-yard strike against LaPorta was also well designed. A fake tunnel screen that burned Iowa earlier left the near end alone in the Colorado state high school for Petras’ second touchdown pass of the day.

“We have been training all week,” said Petras. “We put on a few screens last week and thought we could take a picture on it.”

The thought of LaPorta while the ball was in the air?

“Don’t let it down,” he joked. “… When you’re so wide open, you question yourself.”

Petras then connected with Nico Ragaini for a 34-yard clutch to set up Caleb Shudak’s 45-yard basket for a 24-14 lead with 12:32 left in the game.

The defense resisted from there. He limited Colorado State to 32 yards in the third quarter and 58 in the fourth. And when the final horn sounded, the second half ended with Iowa recording their 26th straight game, keeping their opponent 24 points or less.

“They’re a great team. They gave us our best shot,” said Iowa defensive end Zach VanValkenburg. “We cannot go out of here with our heads down.”

Iowa’s tight-knit linebacker continues to be a strength of this team.

Not to be outdone, Seth Benson had 11 tackles, giving the Iowa inside linebacker tandem a total of 29 on Saturday. Campbell and Benson both later explained how their close friendship off the pitch helps them on the pitch.

Benson said he and Campbell regularly participated in Bible studies together.

“It’s just something that we value in our lives,” Benson said. “If it’s broken down I’m always going to pick it up. If I’m down it’s always going to pick me up. I still somehow know his manners.… See someone go about their business like they do, c it’s just pushing you to be taller. “

Campbell and Benson played as middle linebackers last year. Now, with last year’s linebacker Nick Niemann going to the Los Angeles Chargers, they’re together almost all the time in the middle of the Iowa defense.

“As a Christian it’s pretty cool to have someone right next to you who you’ve talked about difficult things with, someone you can trust,” Campbell said.

For the season, Campbell’s 43 tackles lead the team. Benson’s 31s are second. And fellow linebacker Jestin Jacobs continues to make an impact; he is third on the team with 24.

The worst half of Iowa’s season was the anti-Iowa half.

Leading 7-0 in the second quarter, things looked pretty good. So on the third and -8 of Iowa’s own 9s, offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz probably didn’t think he was making the worst decision in the world to hand him to fullback Monte Pottebaum for 4 yards.

But Tory Taylor’s ensuing punt was knocked back – the first I can remember for the Australian in his two-year career in Iowa – out of bounds for just 22 yards. The Hawkeyes are used to this style of work, with Taylor throwing a 60-yard yardstick and then letting the defense do its job.

But this time Colorado State shifted the field and converted three key third downs to tie the score at 7-7. The first, a 15-yard run from quarterback Todd Centeio on third and 11 of the 36, may have benefited from a penalty that was not called (Noah Shannon appeared to be held up to the point where the run of Centeio started).

Then, in response, the Iowa offense appeared to do what it used to – ending the second quarter with points – after Petras connected with Keagan Johnson for 49 yards. But a poor decision by Petras on a tunnel screen on CSU’s first and 10 of 14 ended his Ferentz-era record streak of 163 non-intercepting pass attempts. Instead of scoring a point halfway through and starting the third quarter with the ball and the lead, the Hawkeyes were in trouble.

Defensive back Robert Floyd caught the pass for Tracy and sent it back 62 yards to set up another Rams touchdown.

Think about Iowa’s victory over Iowa State. He was backed up by big punters and a big play defense. This time Iowa faced high-profile All-American punter Ryan Stonehouse and the victim of a big play defense.

As for the Iowa defense, it was good on the first and second downs in the first half, but not on the third down. The Rams converted nine of 13 third-down chances in the first 30 minutes; at the start of the game, they had converted just 18 of 51 (35%) and Iowa was allowing just 12 of 43 (28%) for the season.

Again, a totally non-Iowa half.

“They have a very good tight wing (in Trey McBride) and a very good football team,” said Benson. “We have to tighten up in the third downs and get off the pitch.… They gave us looks that we had to adapt to after half-time.”

It was a day of firsts (but not last) for Keagan Johnson.

The real Bellevue, Nebraska freshman got his first career start when he lined up as one of two wide receivers on the field on Saturday. He’s been a revelation since arriving on campus in January, certainly a reward for the growth and understanding of the playbook he’s shown in a short period of time.

Johnson would become the Hawkeyes’ best option on offense in the first half. When he beat his man on the straight sideline to grab a 43-yard touchdown pass from Petras, it was a signal that Johnson can do special things in Iowa.

“When I went out and saw the press (cover), me and Spencer, we know that. We have that connection,” Johnson said. “I can win those deep balls. I was just hoping I could get off the line cleanly. And thanks to Spencer, the ball couldn’t have been pitched better.”

Yeah, that was just his first career take. But it was a beauty. And it was hard; Johnson said he lost the ball to the sun as he arrived. He secured the ball on the 5-yard line but made sure to protect it while being tackled as it tumbled into the end zone.

“I lost the ball for about three seconds. Luckily it came back into my vision,” Johnson said.

As a reminder, Johnson took down a 49-yard-deep shot from Petras late in the second quarter. It didn’t lead to points. But Iowa is heading into the Big Ten game knowing he has a potential passing threat deep in his pocket. Johnson finished with those two catches for 92 yards, or 33.1 percent of Iowa’s 278 yards.

The last time Iowa had a real deep threat to freshmen? He also wore No.6: Ihmir Smith-Marsette in 2017.

Owners of the longest non-conference winning streak in the country? Iowa hawk eyes.

Oops, Minnesota. PJ Fleck’s Golden Gophers responded poorly after beating Colorado 30-0 last week, falling astoundingly at home to 31-point underdog Bowling Green, 14-10. Bowling Green had lost 11 straight games on FBS until Saturday, a stark reminder – especially in Minneapolis – that teams must show up ready to play every Saturday.

As a result, Minnesota’s 21-game non-conference winning streak ended on Saturday. And now, after beating Colorado State, the Hawkeyes have the best non-conference streak in the country at 15.

Of these 15, four faced the Big 12 (all in Iowa), three Mid-American (Northern Illinois, Miami of Ohio, Kent State), two Mountain West (Wyoming, Colorado State), two Conference USA (Middle Tennessee , North Texas), FCS (Northern Iowa), ACC (Boston College in Pinstripe Bowl 2017), SEC (Mississippi State in Outback 2019) and Pac-12 (USC in Holiday Bowl 2019).

The Hawkeyes’ last non-conference loss was on Jan. 1, 2017, to Florida in the Outback Bowl. Their next non-conference game will likely be in a bowl game this season. In 2022, Iowa’s three non-Big Ten games are at home against South Dakota State, Iowa State and Nevada.

Hawkeyes columnist Chad Leistikow covered the sport for 26 years with The Des Moines Register, USA TODAY and Iowa City Press-Citizen. Follow @ChadLeistikow on Twitter.


Source link

Penn State No.6 drops 1-0 to No.2 Iowa in B1G field hockey clash

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania. – The Penn State Nittany Lion field hockey team (6-1, 1-1 B1G), ranked No.6 in the NFHCA coaching poll, lost a close game in their first Big Road game Ten at No.2 in Iowa (9-0, 2-0 B1G) at Iowa City. Penn State lost 1-0 in the first of two games at Iowa City this weekend (this game counts towards the conference standings because it is a regular conference game).

The teams traded goods in the first three minutes. Iowa had two deep-down possessions on the Penn State side, with both efforts ending with the ball passing through the baseline. Penn State took control of the ball and brought it down into the Iowa circle. Jemma punch (McDowall, Australia) saw a first shot blocked by Iowa goalie Grace McGuire and a rebound shot slipped right off. Mackenzie allessie (Mount Joy, Pa.) Also had a first blow of wide sail seconds later. Annika Urbine saw a shot blocked at 6:30 in the first half as Iowa first hit the cage. Maddy Murphy’s 3:45 shot was right next for Iowa. A late shot from Ellie Holley was saved by the Penn State goalie Brie Barraco (Allentown, Pa.) And the game was tied 0-0 in the second period.

Two minutes into the second period, the Lion defense looked to let an Iowa shot from outside the circle get away, but the ball hit the post and came back into play. Lion, led by Elena Vos (Grave, Netherlands) pushed the ball. Iowa kept the ball, Esme Gibson taking a shot that was blocked just in front of the cage with 12:00 p.m. left in the half. Meghan reese (Coopersburg, Pa) stole an Iowa pass with just under 9:00 am left and worked the ball down the right side of the Iowa circle, with Sophie Gladieux (Boyertown, Pa.) Trying to put pressure on the cage. But the Iowa defense held on as the Hawkeyes pushed the ball into the field and caught the game’s first penalty corner at 8:15. Penn State stopped Iowa’s first corner, but Iowa took a quick second. The Hawkeyes connected at the second turn, with Lokke Stribbs scoring on the turn with help from Leah Zellner and Anthe Nijziel at 7:51. The Hawkeyes kept the pressure on Penn State for the next five minutes and captured their third corner of the period with 2:58 left at the half. The Penn State defense held, and the Nittany Lions were led by one in intermission.

Iowa dominated Penn State 11-4 in the first half, including a 7-0 advantage in the second period. Barraco made two saves for the Lions while McGuire made one for Iowa. Iowa had a 3-0 corner lead in the first two periods.

The opening minutes of the third period were contested in midfield, with each team scoring a few interceptions. But neither team pushed the ball into the opponent’s circle until 1:25 p.m. when Iowa passed through the Lion’s circle and out of bounds. The Nittany Lion defense worked hard over the next 2 hours to keep Iowa from collapsing into the Penn State Circle. The Hawkeyes were hit for a green card with 11:00 a.m. left in the period, but Iowa managed to kill the advantage and the clock went down to 9:00 a.m. Gery Schnarrs (Camp Hill, Pa.) And the Penn State defense stopped a quick break in Iowa and Penn State moved the ball to the Iowa side. But the Iowa defense was up to the task and Iowa regained possession, moved the ball down the field and grabbed the first corner of the second half with 6:53 on the clock. Meghan reese deftly defended the corner and started a quick break that ended in the Iowa circle. Allessie and Bree Bednarski (Wyoming, Pa) moved the ball past the Iowa cage and forced the first Lion corner of the game with 6:22 on the clock. Allessie took the turn, feeding Vos who spotted Anna simon (Hanau, Germany). Simon’s shot was ruled out, however, with 6 hours remaining on the quarterfinal. The teams traded cards (green for Iowa, yellow for Penn State) in the final 2 hours of the period and Penn State was down one after three.

The Penn State defense had to kill an Iowa player advantage in the opening minutes of the final period to hold the game to one goal thanks to the third period yellow card. The Hawkeyes kept the pressure on Penn State and the Iowa offense nearly found the cage with 11:34 left. But a shot from Holley hit the crossbar and the game remained 1-0 with 11:30 on the clock. Penn State received another yellow card with 9:40 left, giving the Hawkeyes the player advantage. The Nittany Lions held off the Hawkeyes’ offense over the next few minutes, killing the yellow card advantage and keeping the ball on the Iowa side. First year students Sophie mannino (Doylestown, Pennsylvania) and Anouk Knuvers (‘s-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands) helped spark Penn State’s defense in the fourth period. Emilie Farrell (Wyoming, Pa) led the ball to the Iowa circle as the clock moved to 3:00 and forced a penalty corner. The corner was defended by Iowa, but Penn State held the ball with 2:40 left. Penn State tried to force a corner over the next minute, but the Iowa defense prevented Penn State from taking another shot and the Nittany Lions lost a hard-fought game 1-0.

“Offensively, I really think Bree Bednarski played really well, but we didn’t show a lot of intensity until the last period, ”said head coach Char Morett-Curtiss. “It’s hard to lose a player for 10 minutes against a team like Iowa and generate an offense. We will learn a lot from this game that will help us prepare for Sunday and every game to come this season. “

Iowa dominated Penn State 12-6, with the Lions holding a 2-1 lead in the second half. Barraco made two saves, McGuire made one, all in the first half. Iowa had a 4-2 advantage on the penalty corners. The shutout was the seventh in a row for Iowa. It also marks the fourth consecutive time Penn State has lost 1-0 to Iowa, including two 1-0 games last season at Virginia Beach and a 1-0 overtime loss in the Big Ten Tournament title game in 2019 at Penn State.

Penn State is now 6-1 overall, 1-1 in the Big Ten. Iowa is now 9-0, 2-0 B1G. The two teams meet again on Sunday, September 26 at 1 p.m. EST (12 p.m. local time) in a non-conference game.

Fans are encouraged to follow the Nittany Lion field hockey team online at www.GoPSUsports.com (click teams, click field hockey), on Twitter @pennstateFH, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pennstatefieldhockey .

GAME BREAKDOWN

RATING: 1 2 3 4 FINAL

PENN STATUS 0 0 0 0 0

Iowa 0 1 0 0 1

STATS: PSU IOWA

Shots 6 12

Corners 2 4

SUMMARY OF POINTS (goal / assist) – TIME

1st: IOWA – Lokke Stribbs (Leah Zellner, Anthe Nijziel); 7:51

GOALKEEPERS: MIN GA S

Power supply : Brie Barraco 60:00 1 2

IOWA: Grace McGuire 60:00 0 1


Source link

COVID-19 Live Updates: Hospitalizations Hit New High in Iowa for 2021 | Connect FM | Local news radio

(NEW YORK) – The United States faces a wave of COVID-19 as the most contagious delta variant continues to spread.

More than 681,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 while more than 4.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns University Hopkins. The average number of daily deaths in the United States has increased by about 20% over the past week, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

The United States continues to fall on the list of global vaccination rates, currently at number 45, according to data compiled by the Financial Times. According to CDC data, only 64% of Americans aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

23 Sep 5:29 p.m.

CDC panel votes to recommend recalls for people 65 and over and people with health conditions

The CDC’s independent advisory committee voted unanimously to recommend Pfizer boosters for people 65 years of age and older as well as residents of long-term care facilities at least six months after their second dose.

The panel also voted to allow people as young as 18 to receive the booster if they have an underlying health condition, although people under 49 should only receive this third dose if the benefits are met. outweigh the risks, the panel said.

The panel voted “no” for a recall for people in work or institutional settings where “the burden of COVID-19 infection and the risk of transmission are high”.

23 Sep 3:21 p.m.

More than 26 million Americans potentially eligible for recall next week

Pending recommendations from the CDC panel and approval from the CDC director, more than 26 million Americans may soon be eligible for a third dose of Pfizer. This includes 13.6 million adults aged 65 and over and 12.8 million adults aged 18 to 64 who completed their primary series at least six months ago. Among those aged 18 to 64, anyone considered “at high risk” may be eligible for an additional dose.

To date, over 220 million doses of Pfizer have been administered in the United States

Sep 23, 12:40 p.m.

CDC advisory board expected to vote on Pfizer booster in hours

The CDC’s independent advisory committee is expected to vote around 3 p.m. ET on which Americans are now eligible for a Pfizer recall.

After the vote, CDC director Rochelle Walensky is expected to weigh in with her official approval. The CDC is not bound by the panel’s recommendations but generally follows them. State officials can also implement their own criteria.

The FDA granted clearance to the following groups on Wednesday: Anyone 65 years of age or older as well as people as young as 18 if they have a health condition that puts them at risk of severe COVID-19 or are busy a frontline job that makes it more likely that they would get infected. After clearance Wednesday evening, Acting FDA Commissioner Dr Janet Woodcock said some of the groups that could be classified as frontline workers are health care workers, teachers and grocery store staff, as well as incarcerated people and homeless shelters.

Sep 23, 10:49 a.m.

West Virginia and Montana case rates doubled last month as Alaska sets records

Alaska currently has the highest case rate in the country, followed by West Virginia, Wyoming, Kentucky, Montana and South Carolina, according to federal data.

West Virginia and Montana have seen their case rate double in the past month. In Alaska, case metrics are at record highs, according to federal data.

Hospital admissions fell about 12.5% ​​last week, with improvements in Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana, according to federal data.

Seven states, however, have less than 10% critical care availability: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Even heavily vaccinated states are experiencing shortages. A central Massachusetts health system, UMass Memorial Health, is running out of intensive care beds following the admission of an influx of COVID-19 patients in recent weeks.

Sep 23, 8:21 a.m.
Team USA to demand COVID-19 vaccination at future Olympics and Paralympics

The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee has said it will require every member of its delegation to be vaccinated against COVID-19, starting this year.

According to a new policy posted on Team USA’s website, a COVID-19 vaccine mandate will take effect on November 1 for “all employees, athletes, contractors and others,” unless they are granted a medical exemption or religious before entering the Olympic and American Games in the United States. Paralympic Committee facilities.

On December 1, this mandate “will extend to all members of the Team USA delegation or to the hopes of the future Games”. Those on the long list for the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics must submit proof of full COVID-19 vaccination by that date or have received an exemption in order to compete in the next Games, according to the policy dated 21. September.

“The health and well-being of our Olympic and Paralympic community continues to be a top priority,” Team USA said on a webpage detailing the new requirement. “This step will increase our ability to create a safe and productive environment for athletes and Team USA staff, and allow us to restore consistency in planning, preparation and optimal service to athletes.”

Sep 23, 6:38 a.m.
COVID-19 hospitalizations hit new high in Iowa for 2021

More people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in Iowa than at any other point
this year so far, according to weekly data released Wednesday by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

Data shows that there are now 638 people hospitalized with the disease statewide, up from 578 last week. Although the figure is far from Iowa’s peak of over 1,500 in mid-November last year, it is the most COVID-19 hospitalizations Hawkeye state has recorded since December.

Sep 22 19:48
FDA clears Pfizer booster dose for people 65 years and older, at high risk

The United States Food and Drug Administration has authorized a third booster dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for people 65 years of age and older or at high risk of severe COVID-19, the agency said on Wednesday.

The dose is allowed to be administered at least six months after the second injection. High risk beneficiaries must be at least 18 years old.

The announcement comes days after a similar recommendation from FDA advisers.

The advisory board of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to vote on the recall recommendations on Thursday.

22 Sep 18:04
Florida lets parents choose to quarantine asymptomatic, close-contact children

The Florida Department of Health on Wednesday released an emergency rule that allows parents to choose to quarantine their children if they are considered close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19.

In such cases, parents can let their children “attend school, school-sponsored activities or be on school property, without restrictions or disparate treatments, as long as the student remains asymptomatic,” it said. the rule of urgency.

The move is the state’s latest to hold parents accountable for coronavirus measures in schools. In July, Governor Ron DeSantis issued an executive order giving parents the choice of whether or not to send their children to school with masks on, sparking an intense back-and-forth between state and districts that made mandatory masks in the weeks that followed.

DeSantis touted the new “symptom-based approach” during a press briefing on Wednesday.

“Quarantining healthy students is incredibly damaging to their academic advancement,” he said. “It’s also incredibly disturbing for families across the state of Florida. “

At least one Florida superintendent has spoken out against the new quarantine rule.

“I find it ironic that the state’s new rule begins with the phrase ‘Due to an increase in COVID-19 infections, largely due to the spread of the delta variant of COVID-19”, “Carlee Simon, superintendent of public schools in Alachua County, said in a statement on Twitter on Wednesday.

“In fact, this rule is likely to further the spread of COVID-19 by preventing schools from implementing the common sense masking and quarantine policies recommended by the vast majority of medical professionals, including those in the county. Alachua, ”she added.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Source link

Hospitalizations reach another historic high in Iowa for 2021 – Deltaplex News

(NEW YORK) – The United States has faced a wave of COVID-19 as the most contagious delta variant continues to spread.

More than 681,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 while more than 4.7 million people have died from the disease worldwide, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns University Hopkins. The average number of daily deaths in the United States has increased by about 20% over the past week, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

The United States continues to fall on the list of global vaccination rates, currently at number 45, according to data compiled by the Financial Times. According to CDC data, only 64% of Americans aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Here is how the news is evolving. Every hour in the East:

23 Sep 5:29 p.m.

CDC panel votes to recommend recalls for people 65 and over and people with health conditions

The CDC’s independent advisory committee voted unanimously to recommend Pfizer boosters for people 65 years of age and older as well as residents of long-term care facilities at least six months after their second dose.

The panel also voted to allow people as young as 18 to receive the booster if they have an underlying health condition, although people under 49 should only receive this third dose if the benefits are met. outweigh the risks, the panel said.

The panel voted “no” for a recall for people in work or institutional settings where “the burden of COVID-19 infection and the risk of transmission are high”.

23 Sep 3:21 p.m.

More than 26 million Americans potentially eligible for recall next week

Pending recommendations from the CDC panel and approval from the CDC director, more than 26 million Americans may soon be eligible for a third dose of Pfizer. This includes 13.6 million adults aged 65 and over and 12.8 million adults aged 18 to 64 who completed their primary series at least six months ago. Among those aged 18 to 64, anyone considered “at high risk” may be eligible for an additional dose.

To date, over 220 million doses of Pfizer have been administered in the United States

Sep 23, 12:40 p.m.

CDC advisory board expected to vote on Pfizer booster in hours

The CDC’s independent advisory committee is expected to vote around 3 p.m. ET on which Americans are now eligible for a Pfizer recall.

After the vote, CDC director Rochelle Walensky is expected to weigh in with her official approval. The CDC is not bound by the panel’s recommendations but generally follows them. State officials can also implement their own criteria.

The FDA granted clearance to the following groups on Wednesday: Anyone 65 years of age or older as well as people as young as 18 if they have a health condition that puts them at risk of severe COVID-19 or are busy a frontline job that makes it more likely that they would get infected. After clearance Wednesday evening, Acting FDA Commissioner Dr Janet Woodcock said some of the groups that could be classified as frontline workers are health care workers, teachers and grocery store staff, as well as incarcerated people and homeless shelters.

Sep 23, 10:49 a.m.

West Virginia and Montana case rates doubled last month as Alaska sets records

Alaska currently has the highest case rate in the country, followed by West Virginia, Wyoming, Kentucky, Montana and South Carolina, according to federal data.

West Virginia and Montana have seen their case rate double in the past month. In Alaska, case metrics are at record highs, according to federal data.

Hospital admissions fell about 12.5% ​​last week, with improvements in Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana, according to federal data.

Seven states, however, have less than 10% critical care availability: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Even heavily vaccinated states are experiencing shortages. A central Massachusetts health system, UMass Memorial Health, is running out of intensive care beds following the admission of an influx of COVID-19 patients in recent weeks.

Sep 23, 8:21 a.m.
Team USA to demand COVID-19 vaccination at future Olympics and Paralympics

The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee has said it will require every member of its delegation to be vaccinated against COVID-19, starting this year.

According to a new policy posted on Team USA’s website, a COVID-19 vaccine mandate will take effect on November 1 for “all employees, athletes, contractors and others,” unless they are granted a medical exemption or religious before entering the Olympic and American Games in the United States. Paralympic Committee facilities.

On December 1, this mandate “will extend to all members of the Team USA delegation or to the hopes of the future Games”. Those on the long list for the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics must submit proof of full COVID-19 vaccination by that date or have received an exemption in order to participate in the next Games, according to the policy dated 21. September.

“The health and well-being of our Olympic and Paralympic community continues to be a top priority,” Team USA said on a webpage detailing the new requirement. “This step will increase our ability to create a safe and productive environment for athletes and Team USA staff, and allow us to restore consistency in planning, preparation and optimal service to athletes.”

Sep 23, 6:38 a.m.
COVID-19 hospitalizations hit new high in Iowa for 2021

More people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in Iowa than at any other point
this year so far, according to weekly data released Wednesday by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

Data shows there are now 638 people hospitalized for the disease statewide, up from 578 last week. Although the figure is far from Iowa’s peak of over 1,500 in mid-November last year, it is the most COVID-19 hospitalizations Hawkeye state has recorded since December.

Sep 22 19:48
FDA clears Pfizer booster dose for people 65 years and older, at high risk

The United States Food and Drug Administration has authorized a third booster dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for people 65 years of age and older or at high risk of severe COVID-19, the agency said on Wednesday.

The dose is allowed to be administered at least six months after the second injection. High risk beneficiaries must be at least 18 years old.

The announcement comes days after a similar recommendation from FDA advisers.

The advisory board of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to vote on the recall recommendations on Thursday.

22 Sep 18:04
Florida lets parents choose to quarantine asymptomatic, close-contact children

The Florida Department of Health on Wednesday released an emergency rule that allows parents to choose to quarantine their children if they are considered close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19.

In such cases, parents can let their children “attend school, school-sponsored activities or be on school property, without restrictions or disparate treatments, as long as the student remains asymptomatic,” it said. the rule of urgency.

The move is the state’s latest to hold parents accountable for coronavirus measures in schools. In July, Governor Ron DeSantis issued an executive order giving parents the choice of whether or not to send their children to school with masks on, sparking an intense back-and-forth between state and districts that made mandatory masks in the weeks that followed.

DeSantis touted the new “symptom-based approach” during a press briefing on Wednesday.

“Quarantining healthy students is incredibly damaging to their academic advancement,” he said. “It’s also incredibly disturbing for families across the state of Florida. “

At least one Florida superintendent has spoken out against the new quarantine rule.

“I find it ironic that the state’s new rule begins with the phrase ‘Due to an increase in COVID-19 infections, largely due to the spread of the delta variant of COVID-19”, “Carlee Simon, superintendent of public schools in Alachua County, said in a statement on Twitter on Wednesday.

“In fact, this rule is likely to further the spread of COVID-19 by preventing schools from implementing the common sense masking and quarantine policies recommended by the vast majority of medical professionals, including those in the county. Alachua, ”she added.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

https://deltaplexnews.com/submit-news/


Source link

5 thoughts on Iowa adding women’s wrestling, including Title IX impact

IOWA CITY – The stories of a young Tom and Terry Brands fighting in their basement in Sheldon are legendary, just as the resumes of the twin brothers would become academically and internationally.

But every year when they were kids, Tom and Terry faced one of their fiercest opponents – a cousin, Misti. She was a year older and lived in Wyoming, but stayed with the Brands family in northwest Iowa for about two months each summer.

“She used to beat Terry and I. She was a fierce competitor,” Tom Brands, 1996 Olympic gold medalist and now in his 16th season as a wrestling coach, told The Register. ‘University of Iowa. “We were best friends, but she kept us both apart. A lot of little brothers who have big sisters have this story.”

In other words, Brands’ appreciation for women’s wrestling dates back almost five decades. This passion will no doubt be felt when women’s wrestling becomes an officially sponsored sport in Iowa in the 2023-24 academic year.

Here are four more thoughts on the college’s announcement Thursday morning to add women’s wrestling as the 22nd varsity sport (and the first addition since women’s football in 1996).

Without the Title IX trial, women’s wrestling would not have been added so quickly.

Iowa Athletic Director Gary Barta has confirmed that a settlement agreement regarding the Title IX lawsuit (originally brought forward a year ago by four female swimming and diving athletes after Iowa announced that it would eliminate four sports in response to financial problems caused by COVID-19) has been completed, with paperwork being the last hurdle. The center of the deal, according to Barta, was that Iowa would add another women’s sport (in addition to restoring women’s swimming). Barta said it was obvious to choose wrestling “for obvious reasons”.

Barta noted that the timeline for adding a women’s sport has been sped up by the lawsuit.

“Without COVID, we wouldn’t have cut sports,” Barta said. “If it hadn’t been for the Title IX trial, I wasn’t ready to add the women’s wrestling yet. But I can tell you that while the timing may be tough, the decision is awesome. are delighted and we are ready to move forward. “

Lawyer James Larew released a statement from Iowa’s female swimming athletes, who applauded the decision and believe it will create more opportunities for female athletes nationwide – as other universities are expected. follow the example of Iowa. Brands said he knew of other people who were about to make a similar announcement.

The NCAA defines Title IX compliance as requiring dollar-for-dollar spending on scholarships for both men and women, and it must be commensurate with the student body. According to the Iowa Fiscal Year 2020 report provided to the NCAA, $ 6,524,387 was spent on athletic assistance for men and $ 5,860,477 for women. (This was, of course, before the elimination of the three men’s sports.)

Barta pointed out that a growing trend in the number of women attending university nationwide was one reason her department was considering adding the fight before COVID and up to five years before.

Wrestler Megastar Spencer Lee, right, and associate men's wrestling coach Terry Brands attend Thursday's press conference announcing the start of women's wrestling in Iowa.

Iowa’s premier women’s wrestling coach will be entering a new facility… and a high level.

Private funding and logistics have enabled the proposed $ 20 million self-contained wrestling facility – which will be built adjacent to the Carver-Hawkeye Arena – to gain board approval. The land is expected to be cleared in the spring or early summer of 2022. And yes, the women’s locker rooms were part of the architectural designs in anticipation of the addition of women’s wrestling.

But beyond that, Iowa’s first female wrestling head coach will step up to a high standard that was set by Dan Gable and now Tom and (associate head coach) Terry Brands. These standards are, without risk of being mistaken, national championship level. The Hawkeye Wrestling Club recently added three women, a sign of the preparatory work underway to put Iowa in a good position when – not if – the sport achieves sanctioned NCAA championship status.

“When you become the next coach of women’s wrestling, there’s a lot at stake,” said Tom Brands. “There’s a lot at stake right out of the gate. “

And think about this: a current teenage wrestling enthusiast knows that if she competes for Iowa, she’ll be rubbing her elbows and likely getting some advice from the great Spencer Lee. I exchanged a few direct Twitter messages with three-time NCAA champion and megastar Hawkeye on Thursday, who has no plans to leave wrestling in Iowa after his eligibility expires after the 2021-22 season. .

“Yes, it’s true!” Lee wrote. “This is a big deal.”

Gary Barta says he wouldn't have added women's wrestling so quickly without the recent Title IX trial.

Adding a sport after the pain of cutting three cannot be lost.

After Barta made the announcement 13 months ago to cut four university-sponsored track and field programs, he said the decisions were final. “The dollars are so important that there really is no way to go to change this decision,” he said in August 2020.

While women’s swimming was ultimately rescued after their Title IX complaint was filed, three men’s sports had their final seasons in the 2020-21 academic year – gymnastics, tennis and swimming.

These three men’s sports, on average, created a deficit for Iowa track and field of about $ 2.67 million per year. Those cost savings were the rationale for the cuts, and athletics ended up borrowing $ 50 million from the university to cover the losses created by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Women’s wrestling is almost certain to run at a loss as well, with Barta expecting spending in the order of $ 500,000 – including coaching salaries and up to 10 authorized scholarships for women. Only two sports in Iowa (and most of the Power Five universities) are profitable: football and men’s basketball. So the financial argument for eliminating sport rings hollow now … especially for male athletes who have had their sport slashed.

“That’s what we thought we had to do (then). I’m expected to be self-sufficient (as a department),” Barta said on Tuesday. “And that was our collective decision and certainly mine in terms of the responsibility of defining how we were going to deal with this crisis and this deficit. And the decision we came to was to eliminate these sports.”

Tom Brands’ press conference remarks began and ended with standing up for women.

First, he congratulated the Iowa Assistant Director of Sports. Barbara Burke was not part of Thursday’s press conference, but she should have been. She directly oversees wrestling and has been a strong partner in helping Brands bring Iowa wrestling back to the top of the NCAA, with a national title in 2021.

“I’ve had some great bosses in my career, and she’s outperforming them all. And I’ve told everyone else (bosses) that too,” Brands said. “Not just because the relationship is strong, but because of the forward thinking, the ability to problem solve.

Iowa Assistant Director of Athletics Barbara Burke has been a strong ally in the Hawkeyes' wrestling program.

“She shares a vision for things that have impact. And you talk about impact, you have an incredibly historic and exciting announcement that… the University of Iowa is adding women’s wrestling.”

Brands was fired on Thursday. After answering questions, but before leaving the stage, he blew up the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. Thirty-two US states sanction the women’s wrestling state championships, but Iowa does not.

Currently, the Iowa Women’s Wrestling Championships are hosted by the Iowa Wrestling Coaches and Officials Association.

“You know what, team up. And let’s use some common sense here and have a dog-sanctioned high school tournament for these girls,” Brands said. “They deserved it. Enough. And they need it. And we need it, I need it.… Go put this thing in this new arena (Coralville).

“Do it. Come on. Let’s get together and do it.”

I could not have said better myself.

Hawkeyes columnist Chad Leistikow covered the sport for 26 years with The Des Moines Register, USA TODAY and Iowa City Press-Citizen. Follow @ChadLeistikow on Twitter.


Source link

Iowa is one of three states that have not seen growth in charter school enrollment

(The Center Square) – While 39 states saw an increase in charter school enrollment in the 2020-2021 school year, Iowa was one of three states that did not. The figures come from a report by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released Wednesday.

Wyoming and Illinois are the other states that have seen a drop in registrations. Iowa (132 students) and Wyoming (631 students) are the only states included in the report that had less than 1,000 students enrolled in charter schools in the 2019-2020 school year. Enrollment in Illinois charter schools in 2019-2020 was 63,462 students.

Enrollment in Iowa charter schools fell 6.8 percent, to nine students, while district school enrollments fell 2.1 percent, to 10,656 students (from 517,189 at 506,533).

The state has two charter schools: Storm Lake / Iowa Central / Buena Vista Early College Charter High School in Storm Lake and Northeast Iowa Charter High School in Maynard. The Dubuque Community School District School Board decided in January 2018 to close its charter school, Prescott Elementary, after the 2017-18 school year, said Heather Doe, director of communications for the Department of Education. Iowa at The Center Square in an emailed statement.

The number of charter schools in Iowa could increase. In the last legislative session, Iowa lawmakers allowed charter schools to apply for permission through the Iowa Department of Education, without going through public school boards. The National Board of Education unanimously approved advancing its proposed rules for the new process last week at its September 16 meeting.

From the 2023-2024 school year, applications to the State Council should be made by August 1 of the previous school year. Charters for the 2022-2023 school year would be due on February 1, 2022. Initial charter school contracts would be awarded for five school budget years. Performance measures would include statewide outcome assessments for English / Language, Arts, and Mathematics.

Charter schools would require a written application, an in-person interview and a public forum, which would allow residents to inquire about the schools’ application. The board would decide, within 75 days of receiving an application, whether the future charter school would be successful.

The Iowans will have until 4:30 p.m. on October 26 to respond to the regulatory proposal. Stakeholders can contact General Counsel and Business Rules Coordinator Thomas A. Mayes by phone at 515-281-8661, by mail at the Grimes State Office Building, Second Floor; 400 E. 14th Street; Des Moines, IA 50319-0416, or by fax at 515-242-5988. The public hearing will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the State Council Chamber of the Grimes State Building, 400 E. 14th St., Des Moines. Another option is to participate by videoconference.

The state council plans to adopt the final rules at its Nov. 17 meeting, Doe said.

Americans for Prosperity Iowa director Drew Klein told The Center Square in an emailed statement that he had heard of interest in opening charter schools from “a handful” of people. , but these potential administrators were told to wait for the department to make rules.

ADVERTISING

“With the publication of the rules, we are optimistic that students and families may see new options appear in the near future,” Klein said. “These proposed rules appear to maintain the legislative intent for innovation and flexibility.”

According to a Des Moines Register / Mediacom poll, 55% of Iowa residents oppose changing the law regarding charter schools without local school board approval.


Source link

Iowa Charter School Enrollment Has Room for Growth | State

(The Center Square) – While 39 states saw an increase in charter school enrollment in the 2020-2021 school year, Iowa was one of three states that did not. The figures come from a report of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released Wednesday.

Wyoming and Illinois are the other states that have seen a drop in registrations. Iowa (132 students) and Wyoming (631 students) are the only states included in the report that had less than 1,000 students enrolled in charter schools in the 2019-2020 school year. Enrollment in Illinois charter schools in 2019-2020 was 63,462 students.

Iowa’s decline in charter school enrollment fell 6.8%, to nine students, while district school enrollment declined 2.1%, to 10,656 students (from 517,189 at 506,533).

The state has two charter schools: Storm Lake / Iowa Central / Buena Vista Early College Charter High School in Storm Lake and Northeast Iowa Charter High School in Maynard. The Dubuque Community School District School Board decided in January 2018 to close its charter school, Prescott Elementary, after the 2017-18 school year, said Heather Doe, director of communications for the Department of Education. Iowa at The Center Square in an emailed statement.

The number of charter schools in Iowa could increase. This last legislative session, Iowa lawmakers have authorized charter schools request authorization from the Iowa Department of Education, without going through public school boards. The State Board of Education unanimously approved the advancement its proposed rules for the new process last week at its board meeting on September 16.

From the 2023-2024 school year, applications to the State Council should be made by August 1 of the previous school year. Charters for the 2022-2023 school year would be due on February 1, 2022. Initial charter school contracts would be awarded for five school budget years. Performance measures would include statewide outcome assessments for English / Language, Arts, and Mathematics.

Charter schools would require a written application, an in-person interview and a public forum, which would allow residents to inquire about the schools’ application. The board would decide, within 75 days of receiving an application, whether the future charter school would be successful.

The Iowans will have until 4:30 p.m. on October 26 to respond to the regulatory proposal. Stakeholders can contact General Counsel and Business Rules Coordinator Thomas A. Mayes by phone at 515-281-8661, by mail at the Grimes State Office Building, Second Floor; 400 E. 14th Street; Des Moines, IA 50319-0416, or by fax at 515-242-5988. The public hearing will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the State Council Chamber of the Grimes State Office Building, 400 E. 14e St., in Des Moines, Presence by videoconference is another option.

The state council plans to adopt the final rules at its Nov. 17 meeting, Doe said.

Americans for Prosperity Iowa director Drew Klein told The Center Square in an emailed statement that he had heard of interest in opening charter schools from “a handful” of people. , but these potential administrators were told to wait for the department to make rules.

“With the publication of the rules, we are optimistic that students and families may see new options appear in the near future,” Klein said. “These proposed rules appear to maintain the legislative intent for innovation and flexibility.”

According to a Des Moines Register / Mediacom poll, 55% of Iowans oppose changing the law to establish charter schools without the approval of the local school board.


Source link

Conflict of interest? Critics question Iowa’s $ 4.5 billion pipeline proposal

Former Iowa Governor Terry Branstad is at the center of concerns of critics over a $ 4.5 billion pipeline project to capture carbon emissions across the state.

  • Opponents of the pipeline are raising questions at recent public meetings about Branstad’s advisory role on the project, and whether his people on the board approving it have a conflict of interest, reports the Des Moines Register.

Why is this important: The Midwest Carbon Express project would cross 30 counties in Iowa and be classified as a hazardous liquid pipeline.

Get market news worthy of your time with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free.

The big picture: Summit Carbon Solutions, the Ames company behind the project, is not alone in proposing to build hundreds of miles of pipelines to capture carbon at ethanol refineries in the Midwest. Texas-based Navigator CO2 Ventures is trying to push forward a similar proposition.

  • According to Summit’s plans, the CO2 captured in factories would be buried in North Dakota.

  • Recent increases in federal tax incentives have sparked a scramble for pipeline projects to help reduce harmful environmental emissions, the AP reports.

Between the lines: Summit Carbon Solutions hired Branstad in March as a senior policy advisor on the project.

  • Summit Carbon’s parent company is owned by Bruce Rastetter, who Branstad appointed to the Iowa board of directors in 2011. Rastetter has remained a longtime political ally of the former governor.

What they say : Ames farmer Lee Tesdell raised questions about a possible conflict of interest at a public meeting last week, saying Branstad should step down or the two IUB members should recuse themselves.

And after: The IUB will continue to inform landowners of Summit Carbon’s proposal at public meetings scheduled until October 15.

More from Axios: Sign up to get the latest market trends with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free


Source link

Colorado State to Iowa odds and lines

The Colorado State Rams (1-2) and Iowa Hawkeyes (3-0) will face off Saturday at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. Kick-off is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. ET. Below we take a look at the Colorado State Lines and Odds vs Iowa; come back for our college football picks and predictions.

Colorado State started off with a pair of losses to FCS South Dakota State and Vanderbilt at home, so last Saturday’s result was all the more surprising. The Rams traveled to Toledo and spanked the Rockets 22-6 as a 14.5-point underdog.

The Hawkeyes, No. 6 in the AFCA Coaching Poll powered by USA TODAY Sports, climbed the standings with an impressive 3-0 SU / ATS start. Iowa beat Indiana at home 34-6 in its Sept. 4 opener, then defeated rival Iowa State 27-17 in a ranked battle at Ames. The Hawkeyes came off 30-7 against the Kent State Golden Flashes last weekend. The Under are also 3-0 this season.

Colorado State to Iowa Rating, Spread and Lines

Odds provided by Tipico Sportsbook; access USA TODAY Sports betting odds for a full listing. The lines were last updated Monday at 5:35 p.m. ET.

  • Silver line: Colorado State +1000 (bet $ 100 to win $ 1000) | Iowa -2500 (bet $ 2500 to win $ 100)
  • Against the spread (ATS): Colorado State +23.5, -112 (bet $ 112 to win $ 100) | Iowa -23.5, -108 (bet $ 108 to win $ 100)
  • Over / Under (O / U): 44.5, O: -110 (bet $ 110 to win $ 100) | U: -110 (bet $ 110 to win $ 100)

TO PLAY: Try our new free daily Pick’em Challenge and win. Play now!

2021 betting statistics:

  • ML: Colorado State 1-2 | Iowa 3-0
  • ATS: Colorado State 1-2 | Iowa 3-0
  • WHERE: Colorado State 1-2 | Iowa 0-3

Stream college football matches on ESPN + by signing up here.

The State of Colorado and Iowa one-on-one

This is the very first meeting between these schools on the grill.

The Rams haven’t faced a school Big Ten since a 34-21 loss and cover to Minnesota on September 24, 2016. The Hawkeyes last faced an enemy from Mountain West on September 2, 2017, a 24-3 victory. and a cover against Wyoming at Kinnick Stadium.

If you’re looking for more sports betting tips and advice, access all of our content at SportsbookWire.com. Please play responsibly.

To follow @Win with Joe to Twitter. Follow SportsbookWire on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

USA TODAY Sports Media Group College Sports Coverage:

Alabama / Arkansas / Auburn / Florida / Georgia / LSU / Michigan / Michigan State / Notre Dame / Ohio State / Oklahoma / Oregon / Penn State / Rutgers / Tennessee / Texas / USC / Wisconsin / College Football News

Gannett can earn income through public referrals to betting services. Editors are independent of this relationship and have no influence on media coverage. This information is for entertainment purposes only. We make no representations or warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of any content.



Source link

Heavy rains and severe thunderstorms possible this afternoon

If there’s anything we’ve learned over the past year, it’s that you should watch out for the possibility of severe weather. With a severe thunderstorm watch issued this hour, it’s time to do it.

The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma issued a severe thunderstorm watch for much of Iowa until 10 p.m. tonight. It’s in effect for 62 of Iowa’s 99 counties, including almost all of our listening area. This means that the conditions are ripe for the development of severe weather phenomena in our region.

A cold front is sweeping through Iowa today, accompanied by humidity. Temperatures at 2 p.m. in Iowa ranged from 88 degrees at Oskaloosa to 61 degrees at Storm Lake. Dew points are also quite high in the front of the front, giving storms additional fuel as they form. A line of storms in central Iowa is moving northeast. As of this writing, no severe weather warnings are in effect in Iowa. However, the thunderstorms are intensifying.

You can keep an eye on the radar HERE.

As the cold front passes, there is a risk of everything from hail to destructive winds, flash floods and even tornadoes. The National Weather Service in the Quad Cities says between 1 and 2 inches of rain is possible in the Cedar Rapids area through tonight.

CBS 2 meteorologist Rebecca Kopelman said the main threat from severe weather comes in the form of strong winds as thunderstorms spread with the cold front.

Please stay alert for the weather the rest of today and tonight. Relief from the unusually hot and humid conditions for the season arrives tomorrow, when highs may not reach 70.

WATCH: Here are the pets banned in every state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to the states, some organizations, including the Humane Society of the United States, advocate standardized federal legislation that would prohibit owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets. company.

Read on to see which animals are banned in your home country, as well as across the country.

WATCH: Here are America’s 50 Best Beach Towns

Each beach town has its own set of pros and cons, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best to live in. To find out, Stacker took a look at WalletHub data, released on June 17, 2020, which compares US beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. Cities had a population of 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From these rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will not be surprised to learn that many of the cities featured here are in one of these two states.

Read on to see if your favorite beach town has made the cut.


Source link